Whisky, that philosophic wine, that liquid sunshine

It is a well-known truth, in this office at least, that archaeology and whisky go well together. Or, perhaps more accurately, that archaeologists and whisky go well together. With a few exceptions (you know who you are, gin drinkers), it is not at all uncommon to find yourself in the company of an archaeologist with a fine appreciation for a single malt (or two, or three). With that in mind, it's a bit of a wonder that we haven't thought to write a blog post combining the two before now (honestly, archaeology and whisky are two of my favourite things, what were we thinking). It won't surprise any of our readers, I think, to hear that alcohol bottles are one of the most common artefacts we find on 19th century sites (here in Christchurch and throughout New Zealand). Despite the temperance movement in the late 19th century and the many discussions and testimonies about the evils of the demon drink, alcohol remained a popular product. As with the gin bottles we discussed a while back, however, it can be difficult to know exactly which types of alcohol were originally contained in these bottles - unless we have a label or embossing (and even then, these bottles were reused over and over again for a variety of products). Fortunately for this post, as it happens, we've been lucky enough to find a few examples that do have labels, each with their own story to tell about whisky consumption in Christchurch.

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Johnnie Walker.

Genuine pure whisky will never injure the system.

removing the drunk from whisky

saucel-paisley

squirrel whisky

Kirkliston

doctor's special

thom-and-cameron-for-blog

Thom and Cameron

idle men need duff's whisky

Distiller's Company

heddle leith

Occidental

ruining the whisky punch

Jessie Garland

References

Papers Past. [online] Available at www.paperspast.natlib.govt.nz.

Townsend, B., 2015. Scotch Missed: The Original Guide to the Lost Distilleries of Scotland. Neil Wilson Publishing, England.